MindNet

MindNet  

Game Rules

Welcome to the world of MindNet!

These are the complete rules of the game. Please read them carefully.
You may also want to watch a sample game here.

Introduction

MindNet is a science-fiction game, set in a future society where the virtual and the real mingle, where nanotechnology and neuroimplants improve human bodies and lives, and where people and androids coexist in mutual dependency. You must fight to obtain control over the Global Network, which is the backbone of all the economic, social and political interactions. You will use the most sophisticated technologies, but will also need deception, politics, intrigue and strategy, to recruit all the human (and android) resources to achieve your goal.

MindNet is an Ultracard Game. This means that it's a virtual game that you can play anywhere and any time by just connecting to our web. You don't need to carry your cards with you and you don't need to go to your local shop in the hope you'll find someone to play with. You can play from your own home and you instantly meet players from all over the world. And it also means it's a collectible card game, where you build your own, unique deck of cards to play with, and design your own strategy combining cards from a growing set of hundreds of unique cards with special abilities.

In a game of MindNet you bring with you a deck of cards representing the people you will hire to work for you and the items and possessions they will use, together with events you will make happen to help them out. With these resources and an initial amount of cash (or Credits) you will try and build a virtual empire that govern the world through its command of the Global Network. This network is made up of units called Global Network Elements, or GNEs, called usually "Genies". In each of your turns you will send your individuals to interact with those of your opponent in an attempt to distract or exhaust them (or even to kill them) while you accumulate Genies or even steal them from your opponent. Whoever gets hold of 10 GNEs wins the game!

Card types
There are four types of cards in the MindNet game. Here we examine how they look like and how you read the meaning of their parts and elements. Individuals

These cards represent the individuals, either humans or androids, that you recruit to help you reach your goal. The main drive behind each individual is its motivation level. This indicates how willing they are to work for you, and decreasing the motivation of your opponent's individuals is the way in which you prevent him or her from been able to use these individuals against you. So the main interaction in the game is between the motivation levels of the different individuals. The other main factor in the activity of an individual is its health. When this value reaches zero your individual dies and you loose him or her for good.
Let's now review all the stats and properties of an individual as reflected on its card:

Name
This is the name of the individual so that you can identify them.
Type of individual
There are five different types of individuals:
  • Scientist: scientists search for knowledge and are very good at using technology.
  • Reporter: reporters search for truth and are eager to disclose any intrigues and hidden agendas of other individuals.
  • Politician: politicians only care about power and are willing to deceit others and use any means to reach their goal.
  • Criminal: criminals only care about money and are willing to use violence to reach their goals.
  • Citizen: citizens work hard and usually follow their leaders, but know how to revel when they identify any injustice.
  • Android: androids are human-like robots whose main purpose is to help humans in general and their owners in particular.
Motivation
This represents the level of ambition, will and stamina this individual has.
Health
This indicates the number of damages this individual may receive. Once it reaches zero, the individual dies (or gets retired, for androids)
Aggression
Only some individuals feature an aggression level that allows them to perform violent interactions with other individuals and hurt them directly in their health. The number here indicates how many damages they can cause in one turn.
Price
This is the number of Credits you need to enroll this individual to do your bidding... everyone has a price!
Earnings
While an individual is working for you he or she will generate earnings. This is the number of Credits this individual will generate for you each turn (if he or she is active).
Abilities
The text here tells you what special abilities this individual has. You can use this ability any time you like while the individual is active and after any requirements especified are met. This text may also include traits, which are words at the top that qualify the individual.
Lore text
The text you find in italics in some cards give you some extra information about the individual and their history, but they do not affect the game.

Individuals may be in two different states (while alive): active and exhausted. They generate earnings, can interact with others, and you can use their abilities only while they are active. You indicate that an individual has been exhausted by turning its card sideways.

Items

Items are any kind of objects that are carried by individuals. You always play them on an individual that is already in play, and it becomes attached to it.

Items have the following properties:

Price
This is the number of Credits you have to pay to purchase this item so that you can attach it to one of your individuals.
Earnings
Some items may increase (or decrease) the Credits its bearer generates.
Type of item
There are multiple types of items, like implant, software, weapon, etc.
Motivation Increment
An item may increase or decrease the motivation level of its bearer.
Health Increment
Items may affect the health of their bearers.
Aggression Increment
An item, like a weapon, for example, may add aggression points to its bearer.
Abilities
The text here tells you what special abilities this item gives the bearer. You can use this ability any time you like while the bearer is active and after any requirements especified are met.
Lore text
The text you find in italics in some cards give you some extra information about the item and its features, but they do not affect the game.
Posessions

Posessions are the belongings you have that are not carried by any single individual. They give you some useful abilities that can help your individuals in their interactions with your opponent. They are things like vehicles, workplaces, homes, machinery, documents, etc.

Possessions have the following properties:

Price
This is the number of Credits you have to pay to purchase this possession so you can have it under your control.
Earnings
Some possessions may generate Credits for you each turn.
Type of possession
Possesions may be of different types, like machinery, or workplace.
Abilities
The text here tells you what special abilities this possession gives you. You can use this ability any time you like while the possession is under your control and after any requirements especified are met.
Lore text
The text you find in italics in some cards give you some extra information about the possession and their background, but they do not affect the game.
Events

These cards represent events that happen at a given moment and may affect the game.

Events have the following properties:

Price
This is the number of Credits you have to pay whenever you want the event to take place.
Game text
The text here tells you what the event consists of and what happens when you play it.
Lore text
The text you find in italics in some events give you some extra information about the event and its place in the MindNet world, but they do not affect the game.
How to win

You win by controlling the Global Network. There are two ways in which you can do that:

  • having 10 GNEs at the end of your turn,
  • or having more GNEs than your opponent when the game ends.

A game ends when one of the players wins, or when the players can not perform any actions after their decks have depleted.

How to start

Before you start you need to build a deck of cards with the following restrictions:

  • Your deck must contain at least 50 cards, but there is no maximum number of cards.
  • It can not contain more than 3 copies of any given card.

At the start of a game your deck is already shuffled for you and ready to play, and the Credit counters show 10 initial Credits for each player. To start a game you need to perform the following actions:

  1. Place 5 cards face-down on your GNE area.
  2. Draw 7 Cards.
  3. Choose a player randomly (typically both players throw a 6 or 12-sided dice to see who gets the higher value). That player decides who starts. The player who starts skips the Ready Phase and the Deploy Phase on his or her first turn.
  4. The starting player may recruit individuals and purchase items and possessions, paying their price and meeting any conditions or requirements.
  5. Then the other player does the same.

The table should look like this once you have completed the preparations for a game:

Turn Phases

Players alternate playing turns. Each turn is made up of several phases:

Ready phase

In the ready phase you perform the following steps in the order indicated:

  1. All exhausted individuals get damaged. Dead individuals get discarded.
  2. If you have at least one active individual, you may activate one exhausted individual.
  3. You may pay 4 Credits to activate an individual. You may do this as many times as you want and can.
  4. You may discard a unique individual from your hand to either heal or activate that same unique individual in your home area.
  5. You may discard up to 3 cards. You generate 1 Credit for each card you discard.
  6. Generate Credits: You add Credits for each active Credit-producing card you have in play.
  7. If you have less than seven cards in your hand, draw cards until you have seven.
Deploy phase

In this phase you recruit any individuals, or purchase any items or possessions, paying their price and meeting any conditions or requirements. To recruit an individual or purchase an item or a possession you pay its price by decreasing your Credits counter by that amount and then place that card from your hand into your home area.

Unique individuals can not be played if you control another card with the same name.

Event phase

In this phase you may play any events from your hand or any abilities from cards you control, paying their prices and meeting their requirements, if any.

Approaching Phase

During this phase you may approach your opponent with any of your active individuals. You become the guest player and your opponent becomes the host player. You follow these steps:

  1. You may choose one or more of the active individuals in your home area, declare them an "approaching party", and move them to the interaction area. You then declare an active, not-interacting individual from the other player to interact with your approaching party. If there are no motivated individuals available, the party becomes a "hacker unit" aimed at stealing a GNE from your opponent.
  2. Your opponent may choose another active individual in his/her home area, make it motivation-1 until the end of the turn, and declare it to interact with your approaching party instead of the one you chose. This individual is called a surrogate.
  3. The chosen individual is taken to the interaction area facing your approaching party. They together make up an "interaction unit".
  4. Your opponent may add other motivated individuals from his/her home area to the interaction unit.

These steps may be repeated in order as long as you have active individuals in your home area.

Interaction phase

In this phase your individuals interact with those of your opponent with the following steps:

  1. The host player chooses an interaction to be resolved.
  2. Starting with the approaching player (the player whose turn it is), both players may play events and abilities (from any card they control) in turn until both pass.
  3. Resolving the interaction:
    1. If all of the individuals in one of the approaching parties have died, the interaction is not resolved.
    2. If the party is a "hacker unit" and its total motivation is 2 or greater, you may steal a GNE from your opponent's GNE area and add it to your GNE area.
    3. Otherwise, the approaching party with higher total motivation wins the interaction. If both parties have the same motivation, the host party wins. All the individuals in the losing party get exhausted. If at least one active individual in the winning party has aggression, the player controlling them may choose to damage single individuals instead of exhausting the whole party. In this case the player chooses an individual for each aggressive individual and damage him or her as many times as aggression points the aggressive individual has.
  4. If there are unresolved interactions, go to step 1.
  5. Surviving individuals leave the interaction area in their current state and return to their home areas. Dead individuals get discarded, together with all their attached cards.
Evaluation phase

Now you evaluate your situation and get ready for the next turn.

  1. You add up all Global Net Elements you control. That is the total cards in your GNE area, plus any GNEs your other cards may provide. If you have 10 or more "genies" and you declare it now, you win the game.
  2. Pay taxes: for each 5 Credits you have in your Credit pile, pay one Credit. That is, if you have from 5 to 9 Credits, you pay 1. If you have from 10 to 14, you pay 2. And so on.
Glossary
Approaching party (aka Guest party)
one or more individuals visiting the individuals controlled by the other player.
Control
to have a card in play, in your home area or in the interaction area.
Cyborg
a human bearing an implant, or an Android with an implant?
Degrading
decreasing by 1 the Health maximum value of an individual.
Earning
adding Credits to your Credit balance.
To exhaust
turn the card of an individual sideways to indicate he has lost his capacity to action.
Exhausted individual
an individual who is not active, whose card is turned sideways.
Getting damage
reduce by 1 the Health of an individual. You indicate this by placing a red token on top of the individual's card.
Healing
increasing in 1 the Health of a sick individual. You indicate this by removing a red token from the individual's card.
Health maximum value
the sum of the Health values indicated on an individual and all the cards attached to him.
Host party
one or more individuals that are approached by an approaching party.
Human
an individual who is not an Android.
Interaction unit
the combination of an approaching party and its host party.
Interaction area
the playing area where interactions take place.
Motivation level
the sum of the Motivation values of an individual and all the cards attached to him.
To own a possession
the same as to control a possession.
Paying
removing Credits from your Credit balance.
To purchase
to play an item or a possession from your hand to your home area after paying its price.
Recover/Refresh/Activate
straighten the card of an individual.
To recruit
to play an individual from your hand to your home area after paying its price.
Sick individual
an individual who currently has a Health below his/her current maximum value.
Surrogate
An individual chosen to replace another as host for an approaching party.
Unexhausted/Active individual
an individual who is not exhausted (its card is straightened).
Upgrading
increasing in 1 the Health maximum value of an individual.
You
the player controlling the card this word appears on.
Sample game video



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